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New Jersey Farm Bureau News

How to find PPE Supplies

14 May 2020, Posted by admin in News, Uncategorized

Most New Jersey farmers already know of the necessity to employ personal protective equipment (PPE) for the 2020 growing season. Facial coverings/masks, gloves, hand sanitizers are being used along with social distancing standards to meet New Jersey’s emergency management expectations during the coronavirus pandemic. These requirements are likely to endure for the entire summer through Labor Day, so sourcing PPE on a regular basis should not be underestimated. As a farmer, do you have a reliable source to go to?


One suggestion for those searching for PPE use on the farm is to contact a local janitorial supply vendor. Those are usually established businesses within reasonable proximity for pick-up or delivery to establish a direct relationship. Many of them have ramped up their purchasing activity to meet COVID-related customer demand.

Secondarily, there are companies at large serving the state and adjoining region who can be a source of PPE. An example: General Chemical & Supply of Moorestown, NJ 858 No. Lenola Rd.; 856-778-5550; (www.generalchemicalsupply.com) is ready to do business
with NJFB members. See price list below:

The USDA is finalizing rules for Covid-19 financial assistance for farmers. In addition to regular FSA programs, the agency will likely play a key roll in any additional disaster assistance due to this pandemic. All producers should be prepared to contact their local Farm Service Agency when the time comes, to ensure they get the assistance they need.

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Please note: USDA Service Centers in New Jersey will continue to be open for business by phone appointment only and field work will continue with appropriate social distancing. Program delivery staff will continue to come into the office, but they will be working with producers by phone, and using online tools whenever possible. All Service Center visitors wishing to conduct business with FSA are required to call their Service Center to schedule a phone appointment. In the event a Service Center is not currently available to serve customers on location, producers can receive assistance from the closest alternate Service Center by phone. Learn more at farmers.gov/coronavirus.

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New Jersey Service Center Phone Numbers

Dial extension 2 for FSA, 3 for NRCS, and 4 for RD (*where available) 

– Columbus Service Center, Columbus*, NJ – 609-267-1639

– Freehold Service Center, Freehold, NJ- 732-462-0075

– Frenchtown Service Center, Frenchtown, NJ- 908-782-4614

– Hackettstown Service Center, Hackettstown*, NJ- 908-852-2576

– Vineland Service Center, Vineland*, NJ- 856-205-1225

– Woodstown Service Center, Woodstown, NJ- 856-769-1126

The Equine Science Center has created a webpage with a resource list for Covid-19 Equine Related Resources for New Jersey.

The page is a compilation of resources that have been made available by groups such as the New Jersey Department of Agriculture, New Jersey Farm Bureau, American Association of Equine Practitioners, Equine Disease Communication Center, American Horse Council, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

View the webpage by clicking here.

And be sure to check back regularly as the Equine Science Center will continually provide updates as more resources are available.

As farms that market direct to the consumer they can be open. The farm owner/manager sets the conditions for those visits. The order for entertainment and exhibitions, fairs and shows means all events are cancelled!

It is recommended for the next 10-14 days that horse owners with no direct care responsibilities avoid going to the farm. 

Access can be permitted for horse owners to come care for and work with their animals if that has been part of the stabling agreement.  Farms should set up schedules and limit the number of persons on the farm at any given time. (10 people and under rule is good here) Horse owners should respect the farms limits and guidelines.

The owner or their designee should be the only person to come and work or care for the horse, Families should not all come and visit as a group.

Hand washing and equipment sanitizing should be practiced by all visitors to the farm.

Workers employed by the farm, as well as farriers and other contractors are also able to work and come to a farm. These people need to follow the social distancing rules and respect the operational hours of the farm owner.

The American Horse Council has posted more detailed information about the responsibilities of horse owners and those visiting equine operations fined that information here:

https://www.horsecouncil.org/covid-19-resouces/

As we expect COVID-19 case numbers to grow over the next week this is a prudent recommendation. Farm owners/operators should begin working on plans for owners to see their animals and begin riding as soon as practical. They should work on schedules and protocols to continue social distancing even as they try to return regular business.