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New Jersey Farm Bureau News

For 15 years, certified forester Bob Williams watched over 5,000 acres of woodlands and wetlands in Atlantic County’s Estell Manor. He thinned trees, conducted controlled burns, and planted and fenced seedlings of the increasingly threatened Atlantic white cedar.

When the Christie administration bought the land from Lenape Farms Inc. eight months ago, Williams and the landowners who hired him were lauded by state officials for encouraging forest regeneration, reducing wildfire hazards, and protecting wildlife.

Last week, the forester returned to the site to find sections of the $10,000 fencing down, deer prints in the mud, and many of the seedlings gone.

To read the rest of the story from the Philadelphia Inquirer, click here.

Shirely Kline, owner of Happy Valley Berry Farm, doesn’t create art with paint or clay — instead she uses seeds and soil.

Going down the dirt driveway at Kline’s farm, you eventually enter a cornucopia of raspberries, blackberries, tomatoes, herbs, spinach — an Edenof fresh produce. A major reason Kline’s farm has become so popular among local residents is because Kline does not use pesticides to grow her produce.

Click here to read more from the South Jersey Times.

As House Republicans took a tentative step forward on an immigration overhaul this week and raised the possibility of citizenship for those brought to the United States illegally as young children, immigration advocates found themselves pondering a new question: Is the potential concession as far as many House Republicans are willing to go, or are they slowly inching their way toward a broader compromise?

Click here for the full story from the New York Times.